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Students' Good Work

Students’ Good Work published on Opinion Page of SCMP 
Take a look at your schoolmate's work and learn from them!
 
The links here are the good work in the past years:
 
 
Below are the good work for 2020-2021:
 
Young Post June 4, 2021
Fiona Woo 2C
Young Post May 31, 2021
Suki Leung 1C
Young Post May 31, 2021
Holly Wu 1C
Young Post May 27, 2021
Fiona Woo 2C
Young Post May 25, 2021
Matthew Shum 1D
SCMP May 24, 2021
Joyce Chu 1C
Young Post May 18, 2021
Phoebe Ng 1D
Young Post May 18, 2021
Ericson Li 2B
Young Post May 11, 2021
Yannie Chen 1D
SCMP May 11, 2021
Ivan Chong 5D
Young Post May 11, 2021
Crystal Chan 2B
Young Post May 4, 2021
Zara Leung 2B
Young Post May 4, 2021
Vicky So 2B
Young Post April 29, 2021
Yones Leung 1D
Young Post April 29, 2021
Wing Wong 1D
Young Post April 29, 2021
Phoebe Ng 1D
Young Post April 22, 2021
Thomas Yiu 2A 
Young Post April 15, 2021
Vinci Leung 2C
SCMP April 14, 2021
Lucky Wang 5D
SCMP April 13, 2021
Victor Lee 5D
Young Post April 12, 2021
Toby Wong 4A, Alice Lau 4C
Young Post April 12, 2021
Ryan Sin 2A
SCMP April 11, 2021
Edna Lau 5D
Young Post March 30, 2021
Vannie Chen 1D
Young Post March 25, 2021
Vinky Wu 2C
Young Post March 25, 2021
Vinci Leung 2C
Young Post March 25, 2021
Angel Zhang 2C
Young Post March 23, 2021
Wing Wong 1D
Young Post March 23, 2021
Alvin Chan 2B
Young Post March 18, 2021
Yammi Pan 2D
Young Post March 18, 2021
Vinky Wu 2C
Young Post March 16, 2021
Ansley Au 1A
Young Post March 12, 2021
Kyle Lai 3D
Young Post March 12, 2021
Aidan Szeto 3D
Young Post March 8, 2021
Irene Zeng 1B
SCMP March 5, 2021
Vicky Chan 4B
Young Post March 2, 2021
Fungmen Li 2B
Young Post March 1, 2021
Victoria Li 4D
SCMP February 1, 2021
Juno Wong 4D
SCMP February 1, 2021
Christy Lam 6D
Young Post January 14, 2021
Kate Lun 2B
SCMP January 12, 2021
Juno Wong 4D
Young Post January 11, 2021
Jupiter Lee 2C
SCMP January 11, 2021
Bonnie Wong 5B
SCMP January 9, 2021
Jerry Ng 4D
SCMP January 6, 2021
Kitty Yeung 5B
SCMP January 5, 2021
Fiona Woo 2C
 
SCMP December 6, 2020
Desmond Hui 2A
Young Post December 3, 2020
Wylok Wong 5D
Young Post December 3, 2020
Hilary Lee 5D
SCMP December 3, 2020
Henry Chow 4D
Young Post December 1, 2020
Sunny Shing 1D
SCMP November 30, 2020
Icy Siu 4C
Young Post November 26, 2020
Malcolm Chan 2A
SCMP November 25, 2020
Kaylee Fung 4C
Young Post November 24, 2020
Jason Szeto 1D
Young Post November 23, 2020
Nicole
 
SCMP November 23, 2020
Alvin Wong
 
SCMP November 20, 2020
Vicky Chan 4B
 
Young Post November 17, 2020
Emily Leung 1D
 
Young Post November 16, 2020
Sammy Sun 1A
 
SCMP November 16, 2020
Marcus Leung 4C
 
SCMP November 16, 2020
Angus Lee 5B
 
SCMP November 13, 2020
Andy Tong 6A
 
SCMP November 12, 2020
Jerry Ng 4D
 
SCMP November 11, 2020
Yuki Wong 5B
 
SCMP November 11, 2020
Carrie Chan 5B
 
Young Post November 10, 2020
Emily Leung 1D
 
Young Post November 9, 2020
Victoria Li 4D
 
SCMP November 6, 2020
Owen Hau 2A
 
SCMP November 6, 2020
Coco Siu 5B
 
Young Post November 5, 2020
Timmy Lo 5D
 
SCMP November 5, 2020
Liana Pau 3D
 
SCMP November 3, 2020
Juno Wong 4D
 
Young Post November 3, 2020
Jack Ma 5D
 
Young Post November 3, 2020
Anson Wong 1D
 
SCMP November 2, 2020
Jerry Ng 4D
 
SCMP November 2, 2020
Chloe Li 4D
 
 
SCMP November 1, 2020
Wing Lau 6C
 
SCMP October 31, 2020
Kyle Wong 5D
 
SCMP October 29, 2020
Lovette Lam 4C
 
Young Post October 27, 2020
Ericson Li 2B
 
Young Post October 27, 2020
Jason Szeto 1D
 
SCMP October 23, 2020
Holden Cheng 6E
 
Young Post October 22, 2020
Jack Ma 5D
 
SCMP October 22, 2020
Anson Lam 6E
 
Young Post October 20, 2020
Wylok Wong 5D
 
 
Young Post October 19, 2020
Aidan Lee 1B
 
SCMP October 19, 2020
Harry Ngai 1B
 
SCMP October 18, 2020
Jacky Sit 6A
 
SCMP October 17, 2020
Kimi Chen 2D
 
SCMP October 16, 2020
Agnes Or 2D
 
SCMP October 14, 2020
Mike Fung 6A
 
SCMP October 14, 2020
Hilary Lee 5D
 
Young Post October 13, 2020
Yoyo Cheung 2B
 
SCMP October 13, 2020
Sunny Li 6A
 
SCMP October 13, 2020
Herice Yip 6A
 
Young Post October 13, 2020
Alvin Au 2B
 
Young Post October 12, 2020
Ansley Au 1A
 
SCMP October 10, 2020
Maggie Liao 4D
 
Coronavirus pandemic: why home office may not work for everyone
 
I am writing in response to Peter Kammerer’s “Why I’d happy to work from home post-pandemic and I’m not alone” (September 22). With the fourth wave of Covid-19 looming or perhaps already under way, this takes on added significance.
One line from Mr Kammerer’s piece resonated with me: “Of course, every firm and industry operates differently, so what works for one is not necessarily a formula for another.”
 
Indeed, from the standpoint of family and social interaction, working from home allows for more flexibility, with no time lost to the daily commute. We can manage our day as we wish and achieve that much-prized work-life balance, spending more time with family members and enhancing interpersonal relationships.
 
However, if there are small children or dependant elderly relatives at home, we may find them taking up a great deal of our attention and focus, distracting us when we should be concentrating on work meetings, for example. There can also be technical issues, given that most people do not have got a printer, fax or photocopier at home, which can affect efficiency if that equipment need to be used frequently.
 
Long-term working from home could also impact pay and perks for the employee. The life balance or transport cost savings offered by such work conditions may inspire bosses to offer lower pay in exchange for the convenience. Also, as owners of companies are always profit maximisers, they may buy less in-office equipment and reduce headcount further to cut costs. With so many jobs lost to the pandemic already, this is another risk to look out for.
 
Maggie Liao, Tseung Kwan O
 
Young Post October 8, 2020
Hayden Leung 2C
 
Young Post October 8, 2020
Brian Tong 5D
 
Young Post October 6, 2020
Nelson Yu 5D
 
Young Post October 6, 2020
Kristy Lu 2C
 
SCMP October 6, 2020
Grace Chen 4D
 
SCMP October 6, 2020
Eric Lui 5D
 
Young Post October 5, 2020
Hilary Lee 5D
 
Young Post October 5, 2020
Agnes Or 2D
 
SCMP October 4, 2020
Wylok Wong 5D
 
SCMP October 4, 2020
Rosa Chen 3C
 
SCMP October 01, 2020
Hilary Lee 5D
 
 
SCMP September 30, 2020
Juno Wong 4D
 
SCMP September 27, 2020
Eric Lui 5D
 
SCMP September 26, 2020
Kobe Tsoi 5B
 
SCMP September 26, 2020
Coco Siu 5B
 
SCMP September 25, 2020
Lucky Wang 5D
 
SCMP September 24, 2020
Mani Lau 5A
 
SCMP September 18, 2020
Nicky Tam 5A
 
Mental health decline a dangerous side effect of pandemic
 
People all over the world have been asked to stay home to curb the spread of Covid-19, and the detrimental impact this has had exceeds the obvious effects on our academic, working and social lives. The pandemic is taking an immense toll on our mental health.
 
First, having to stay home with one’s family for too long can affect our mental health. Some people have not only lost jobs due to Covid-19 restrictions but also have to tend to children when schools are closed for physical classes. As a result, there have been clashes among family members over small issues, such as which television channel to watch or the volume at which music is played.
 
Our small flats have become places of rage and frustration rather than happy spaces. These feelings of being overwhelmed can spiral into mental illness.
 
Second, spending too much time on the internet can also affect our mental health. Studies have shown excessive social media use can lead to feelings of depression in some people as constantly comparing our lives to others’ can make us dissatisfied with our lot.
 
Third, lockdowns can result in people becoming more socially withdrawn, which again has been associated with depression and low self-esteem. We must pay attention to the pandemic’s impact on mental health.
 
Nicky Tam, Tseung Kwan O
SCMP September 15, 2020
Coco Siu 5B
 
SCMP September 13, 2020
Tiffany Man 3C
 
Police needs education on ‘minimum necessary force’
 
I am writing in response to the article, “Police defend tactics after video of officer tackling 12-year-old Hong Kong girl goes viral” (September 7).
 
The girl was intercepted by police while they were dispersing protesters in Mong Kok on September 6. In a statement, the police said the girl was subdued “with the use of minimum necessary force” because she “suddenly ran away in a suspicious manner”. However, the girl’s family have explained that she had just been out buying art supplies and ran way because she was scared.
 
From the clip, it appears that she was held down by more than one officer. She was later treated for light injuries. I can only imagine how she felt. Do the Hong Kong police understand the meaning of “minimum necessary force”?
 
The girl and her brother were also fined for violating social distancing rules, which do not allow gathering of more than two people. They intend to contest the fine, but it is unclear how they broke the rules in the first place.
 
I hope the police can reform itself and we can go back to being a democratic and free Hong Kong.
 
Man Pui Ki, Tseung Kwan O
SCMP September 13, 2020
Tiffany Man 3C
 
Police needs education on ‘minimum necessary force’
 
I am writing in response to the article, “Police defend tactics after video of officer tackling 12-year-old Hong Kong girl goes viral” (September 7).
 
The girl was intercepted by police while they were dispersing protesters in Mong Kok on September 6. In a statement, the police said the girl was subdued “with the use of minimum necessary force” because she “suddenly ran away in a suspicious manner”. However, the girl’s family have explained that she had just been out buying art supplies and ran way because she was scared.
 
From the clip, it appears that she was held down by more than one officer. She was later treated for light injuries. I can only imagine how she felt. Do the Hong Kong police understand the meaning of “minimum necessary force”?
 
The girl and her brother were also fined for violating social distancing rules, which do not allow gathering of more than two people. They intend to contest the fine, but it is unclear how they broke the rules in the first place.
 
I hope the police can reform itself and we can go back to being a democratic and free Hong Kong.
 
Man Pui Ki, Tseung Kwan O
SCMP September 13, 2020
Toby Wong 4A
 
How Black Panther actor Chadwick Boseman inspired me
 
I am writing in response to “Stars mourn as Black Panther’s Chadwick Boseman dies of cancer at 43” (August 30). I was taken aback and grieved by the news.
 
The death of this actor is another blow in these months where we have seen political chaos, health crises and economic stagnation. The news caused me to reflect on the ephemerality of life itself. The presence of death all around us these days has motivated me to treasure my loved ones.
 
When I was younger, I was obsessed with the Marvel character Black Panther; he was the only one I deemed worthy of admiration. The meaning and significance of the character grew as I got older, especially when Boseman took on the role of Black Panther and breathed new life into the character, changing what it stood for.
 
According to Bosesman’s colleagues and family, he was brimming with passion and dreams, and was also loving and kind. Boseman even visited the White House in the Obama years to cheer children up and he was praised by the former president.
 
Moreover, although he had been diagnosed with cancer before the filming of Black Panther, he gave his all, continuing to make films while going through chemotherapy and surgery. Why? Because he knew that people’s dreams depended on it. I admire how he leaned into life.
 
His perseverance gave us Black Panther, the first superhero film ever to receive to be nominated for a Best Picture at the Oscars. To me, Boseman is a beacon of hope and leaves a noble legacy; he stands for the courage to live a life that you won’t regret.
 
May Boseman’s spirit live on and may he be remembered among the greats.
 
Toby Wong, Sai Kung
SCMP September 10, 2020
Sammi Lee 5B
 
Hong Kong’s separation of powers row shows students must not think for themselves
 
I am writing to express my feelings about your September 3 editorial “Separation of powers row shows need for checks and balances”. The latest statement from Chief Executive Carrie Lam – “There is no separation of powers in Hong Kong” – has become the talk of the town and stirred up heated debate. As a regular reader of your newspaper, I am writing to express my immense dismay at that statement. Lam was backing up Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung who said there was no separation of powers, whether before or after 1997. He also said it was up to publishers to delete “separation of powers” from liberal studies textbooks. As a history student, I am deeply disappointed.
 
In the early 20th century, the structure of Hong Kong’s government was already formed by the British. There was a governor, a legislature and a judiciary. Although the governor held most of the power at that time, I remember my history textbook saying Hong Kong had an independent justice system, and that the executive authorities and the legislature seldom interfered with the courts. These three powers were continuously developed before 1997.
 
The British government even put forward democratic reform proposals for Hong Kong, and Hong Kong residents’ way of life was to remain unchanged for 50 years, as mentioned in the Basic Law and the Sino-British Joint Declaration.
 
I am able to remember all this clearly because this is basic knowledge of history.
Hong Kong has long been criticised as a “cultural desert”, where cultural development is severely lagging behind that of our counterparts in Asia. I agree with this criticism, as the Hong Kong education system does not encourage students to think deeper. Students are spoon-fed with what is required for exams. The current turn of events is perfect proof of this.
 
It is obvious that the Hong Kong government is going to inculcate into students the version of history that suits them. They want to make sure that teenagers in the future won’t spot the Hong Kong government changing democracy for autocracy.
 
However, the government, schools and teachers have an obligation to guide bewildered juveniles by getting out the correct information and message. They should not change or delete passages and cause misconceptions about the structure of Hong Kong’s government.
 
Youngsters are the wealth of our society and each one of us has the responsibility to ensure they receive a proper education. Only with concerted efforts can we put an end to the distortion of values and protect the future.
 
Sammi Lee, Kwun Tong
SCMP September 10, 2020
Daisy Ip 5B
 
Cut the red tape for students facing e-learning hurdles
 
I was troubled to read your report on a study saying “four in five needy Hong Kong families can’t afford a computer for children’s e-learning”.
 
The third wave of the coronavirus has caused the second prolonged suspension of school this year. To prevent the spread of coronavirus, all students have again been forced to have online lessons at home. This poses a lot of difficulties for the low-income families that can’t afford the tools for e-learning at home. I was shocked to learn that as many as 80 per cent of such families do not own a computer or tablet and that about one-fifth cannot buy Wi-fi either.
 
As it is, learning online without face-to-face communication with teachers has already affected students’ ability to absorb knowledge. If some children do not even have proper tools for e-learning, and may need to share their parents’ mobile phones with siblings to get online, the situation is indeed dire.
 
It was appalling to find nearly 60 per cent of the parents said the schools didn’t offer them any help, and only about 20 per cent reported that schools lent out devices or distributed mobile data cards. The complex application process is believed to be a reason for some schools not bothering to apply for assistance for needy students.
 
The government’s assistance programme is well-intended, yet its effectiveness is unexpectedly low. It would be advisable to lower the eligibility criteria, so more needy students are covered. Directly offering the subsidies to them, instead of depending on the school authorities to apply on their behalf, could be a way to cut the red tape. The assistance policy can then be as effective as intended.
 
Daisy Ip, Lohas Park
SCMP September 6, 2020
Winnie Chen 5A
 
China says it values ethnic minority cultures, but actions don’t bear it out
 
I am writing in response to your report, “Inner Mongolia doubles down on China’s plan to teach key subjects in Mandarin despite protests” (September 3). Although China’s treatment of its ethnic minorities has been criticised globally over the years, the attitude of the Communist Party has not changed.
 
President Xi Jinping has stressed the importance of preserving and promoting the culture of ethnic minority groups and, during a visit to Inner Mongolia last year, said the central leadership is “supportive of protection of intangible cultural heritage”.
 
He has also spoken of multi-ethnicity as “one of China’s distinguishing features”, noting that, “Through evolution, merging, and separation, 56 ethnic groups have emerged and now constitute the Chinese nation. They joined together in building our vast country, creating a long history and brilliant culture.”
 
But, in reality, China is strangling minority culture methodically. The best examples are Xinjiang and southern China. A United Nations human rights panel said in 2018 that China was holding 1 million Uygurs in Xinjiang camps, while other reports have highlighted the detention of ethnic Kazakhs. The purpose of Xinjiang re-education camps is to monitor people from ethnic minority communities, brainwash them into accepting the Community Party’s ideology, and weaken public resistance.
 
Meanwhile, after years of promotion of Mandarin, the mother tongue culture in many parts of southern China has gradually disappeared. In the Pearl River Delta area, political and economic changes have caused a rapid decline in the use of Cantonese. Even in Hong Kong, a primary school prohibited students from speaking Cantonese in class. While a common language can promote cooperation, the Chinese government is forcing people to learn Mandarin at the cost of their mother tongues and using education to control people’s thinking.
 
Learning should be voluntary. The Chinese government could encourage people to learn Mandarin, but should not arm-twist them into doing so. While some grin and bear this treatment, others might be motivated to risk their lives to resist it.
 
It’s incredible to read that Horqin district police released photographs of 129 people taken during demonstrations and offered a reward for information leading to their arrest. This shows that, even when the people resist, China does not seek the path of reconciliation to ease public anger, but chooses to arrest and suppress instead.
 
Winnie Chen, Tseung Kwan O
SCMP Septmerber 5, 2020
Yuki Wong 5B
 
Hong Kong must not let animal cruelty go unpunished
 
I refer to the police investigation of the deaths of several pets, after dozens of animals including cats, rabbits and chinchillas were suspected to have been thrown from a high rise in Sham Tseng. The Department of Justice earlier this week decided not to prosecute the two suspects who surrendered over the case (“Suspected Hong Kong animal killers will not be prosecuted, officials say”, September 3).
 
All forms of life deserve a decent time on earth. Abusing animals is cruel and irresponsible behaviour, and society should pay closer attention to the problem.
 
Many families keep pets, mainly cats and dogs but also rabbits and even snakes. Cute as they are, some people abuse them. Hurting animals that love and trust us is unforgivable, and abusers should be punished for their actions. No animal abuser in Hong Kong should be allowed to get away with it.
 
For a start, courts should pass tougher prison sentences for animal abusers. This will help to deter such cruelty. Light penalties for animal cruelty are scarcely a deterrent and are unfair to the abused creatures.
 
It is also the responsibility of the government to raise public awareness about the seriousness of animal abuse crimes. It should put more effort into highlighting the punishments handed down to those guilty of animal cruelty, as a deterrence.
 
In addition, children must be made aware that every life form is precious and should be respected. Parents should tell their children that pets are friends for life and not just a birthday present that can be used as a toy and then thrown away. Schools ought to ensure that children treat their pets and other animals well and never cause them any harm.
 
The government, parents, schools and society at large should work together to promote better living conditions for all, human or otherwise.
 
Yuki Wong, Tseung Kwan O
SCMP September 1, 2020
Mani Lau 5A
 
Not yet safe to go back to school
 
Amid the Covid-19 pandemic, face-to-face lessons for Hong Kong’s 900,000 kindergarten, primary and secondary school pupils were suspended for four months before resuming in phases from late May. However, with a renewed outbreak recently, officials asked schools to conduct online lessons until further notice.
Now, pupils in the final two years of primary or secondary school, new starters at those levels and final-year kindergarten pupils will be the first to return to campus on a half-day basis later this month. A week later, Form Two to Four and Primary Two to Four pupils, and younger kindergarteners will follow.
I do not agree with these decisions by the education officials. As we were until Sunday still seeing double-digit Covid-19 cases reported daily, it can be assumed that community transmission will not stop in the short term. The government has also just relaxed the social distancing restrictions for some establishments, with entertainment venues resuming operations. This may ramp up the spread of the virus in the society. Resuming school this month may be risky for students.
When classes resume, students will gather in public places, such as the transport hubs, restaurants and elsewhere around school, raising the possibility of virus transmission. Also, if infected but asymptomatic students were to attend class during the incubation period, their classmates or others on their commute could be affected.
To protect students, and avoid a community outbreak again, face-to-face classes should resume only after spread of the virus is completely contained.
 
Mani Lau, Tiu Keng Leng